Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is a method for delivering information technology (IT) services in which resources are retrieved from the Internet through web-based tools and applications, as opposed to a direct connection to a server. Rather than keeping files on a proprietary hard drive or local storage device, cloud-based storage makes it possible to save them to a remote database. As long as an electronic device has access to the web, it has access to the data and the software programs to run it.

It's called cloud computing because the information being accessed is found in "the cloud" and does not require a user to be in a specific place to gain access to it. This type of system allows employees to work remotely. Companies providing cloud services enable users to store files and applications on remote servers, and then access all the data via the internet.

In its essence, cloud computing is the idea of taking all the heavy lifting involved in crunching and processing data away from the device you carry around, or sit and work at, and moving that work to huge computer clusters far away in cyberspace. The internet becomes the cloud, and voilà – your data, work and applications are available from any device with which you can connect to the internet, anywhere in the world.

According to research conducted by business management consultant firm Forrester, the cloud computing market is anticipated to reach $191 billion by the year 2020.

Cloud computing is not a single piece of technology, like a microchip or a cell phone. Rather, it's a system, primarily comprised of three services: infrastructure as a service (IaaS), software as a service (SaaS)+ and platform as a service (PaaS). SaaS is expected to experience the fastest growth, followed by IaaS.

Software as a Service (SaaS): SaaS involves the licensure of a software application to customers. Licenses are typically provided through a pay-as-you-go model or on-demand. This rapidly growing market could provide an excellent investment opportunity, with a Goldman Sachs report projecting that by 2018, 59% of the total cloud workloads will be SaaS.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS): Infrastructure as a service involves a method for delivering everything from operating systems to servers and storage through IP-based connectivity as part of an on-demand service. Clients can avoid the need to purchase software or servers, and instead procure these resources in an outsourced, on-demand service.

Platform as a Service (PaaS): Of the three layers of cloud-based computing, PaaS is considered the most complex. PaaS shares some similarities with SaaS, the primary difference being that instead of delivering software online, it is actually a platform for creating software that is delivered via the internet. A report by Forrester indicates that PaaS solutions are expected to generate $44 billion in revenues by the year 2020. Cloud Advantages

The rise of cloud-based software has offered companies from all sectors a number of benefits, including the ability to use software from any device, either via a native app or a browser. As a result, users are able to carry over their files and settings to other devices in a completely seamless manner. Cloud computing is about far more than just accessing files on multiple devices, however. Thanks to cloud-computing services, users can check their email on any computer and even store files using services such as Dropbox and Google Drive. Cloud-computing services also make it possible for users to back up their music, files and photos, ensuring that those files are immediately available in the event of a hard drive crash.

Cloud computing offers big businesses some serious cost-saving potential. Before the cloud became a viable alternative, companies were required to purchase, construct and maintain costly information management technology and infrastructure. Now, instead of investing millions in huge server centers and intricate, global IT departments that require constant upgrades, a firm can use "lite" versions of workstations with lightning fast internet connections, and the workers will interact with the cloud online to create presentations, spreadsheets and interact with company software.

Individuals find that when they upload photos, documents, and videos to the cloud and then retrieve them at their convenience, it saves storage space on their desk tops or laptops. Additionally, the cloud-like structure allows users to upgrade software more quickly – because software companies can offer their products via the web rather than through more traditional, tangible methods involving discs or flash drives. In 2013, Adobe Systems announced all subsequent versions of Photoshop, as well as other components of its Creative Suite, would only be available through an internet-based subscription. This allows users to download new versions and fixes to their programs easily.

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